top of page

Alternative Provision

What is an 'Alternative Provision'?

Alternative Provision (AP) is defined as ‘education outside school, arranged by local authorities or schools themselves'. Local authorities can arrange education for young people, who because of exclusion, illness or other reasons, would not otherwise receive suitable education.

We therefore provide education programmes that can be delivered to suit learners of any age who need an alternative curriculum.

New Leaf Triangle is an alternative education provider, run as a community interest company (CIC). We provide learning in an outdoor setting in a fun, stress-free and therapeutic way through activities such as horse riding, animal care and handling, forest school, woodworking, arts and crafts and sports and games.


During term time, we take students from age 5 upwards on a regular booking of between half a day per week up to 2 days per week (or 3 days for post-16 placements). We support young people who have autism, ADHD, or other neurodiverse conditions, as well as those with attachment disorders or social, emotional and mental health difficulties. Our aim is to help re-engage students with learning where they have previously struggled with a classroom setting.


All our staff work on a 1:1 ratio with students so each young person has a bespoke curriculum designed for their needs. We are an approved Open Awards Centre for a range of vocational courses for age 14 plus, including in horse and animal care and in functional maths and English.

How to request a place:
Most of our students come to us on referral from a local authority or school, though we do have a small number of students where parents self-fund. Our costs are £36 per hour; days are 6 hours (9.30 to 3.30) and half days 3 hours (either 9.30 to 12.30 or 12.30 to 3.30).

 

To request a place, an expression of interest needs to be made to our business coordinator at kath.newleaftriangle@gmail.com giving us a small amount of information about the student and the number of days and type of placement being sought. We will then ask that a full referral form is completed, and a visit arranged to our site for the young person with their teacher or parent/carer. The visit gives the student the chance to see if we are somewhere they would like to spend time, and also allows us to check that we can provide for their needs.

 

After the referral form and visit are completed, we will review the information and make a decision whether we are able to provide for the young person and if so, the number of weekly sessions that would be appropriate for that student, taking into account the referrer’s preferences and our current capacity. Once a place is approved, we will agree a “best fit” for start dates and days. This is usually within six weeks, depending on the current demand, and on the urgency and flexibility of the placement. Parental permissions for activities, data use and full medical information must also be returned at least one week before the agreed start date of the placement.

 

Placements do not need to have a fixed end date – often we work with students until they are more settled in their school, or are ready to return to a classroom, or until a full time school place is found. We only ask for a minimum of 4 weeks’ notice so we can plan ahead for future referrals (please note that placements that finish with less than 4 weeks’ notice will be subject to a cancellation fee according to our Booking and Cancellation policy.

IMG_7802

IMG_7802

IMG_7803

IMG_7803

IMG_6427

IMG_6427

IMG_7280

IMG_7280

f5688f28-afb8-4d91-a8df-dd4687e30ab7

f5688f28-afb8-4d91-a8df-dd4687e30ab7

IMG_7795

IMG_7795

IMG_20220901_100129

IMG_20220901_100129

IMG_7799

IMG_7799

Image by Rémi Walle
“He was unable to access full time mainstream primary education as the sensory environment and demands were too much and he spent much of his day in periods of significant distress behaviours. Attending NLT means that he is able to better access the curriculum within mainstream education as he is now on a part time timetable with work sent home on the afternoons he is not at NLT. He perceives the demands differently – I suspect because he associates NLT with positive experiences and without realising is learning at NLT. He feels under less pressure to complete work outside the classroom as a result which has helped him access the learning he does at home”
bottom of page